Fandom

Microsoft Wikia

Windows 3.1x

860pages on
this wiki
Add New Page
Talk0 Share
Win31acc

Windows 3.11

Windows 3.1x (codenamed Janus) was a series of 16-bit GUI operating environments for MS-DOS developed by Microsoft for use on personal computers. The series began with Windows 3.1, which was released on April 6, 1992 as a successor to Windows 3.0. Subsequent versions were released between 1992 and 1994 until the release of its successor, Windows 95. Support for all 16-bit versions of Windows ended on December 31, 2001.

On November 8, 1993, Windows 3.11 was released, which introduced problem corrections. On November 22, 1993, Windows 3.2, a version of Windows 3.11 in Simplified Chinese, was introduced.

Microsoft Windows Compatible

Microsoft Windows Version 3.1x Compatible Logo (1994-2001).

Windows for Workgroups

Windows for Workgroups is an extension to Windows 3.1x allowing communication with a workgroup using the SMB protocol over NetBIOS. The first version, Windows for Workgroups 3.1, was released in October 1992.

Windows for Workgroups 3.1

Windows for Workgroups 3.1 (codenamed Winball and Sparta during development) was released in October 1992, and is an extended version of Windows 3.1 that includes native networking support. It comes with SMB file sharing support via NetBIOS-based NBF and/or IPX network transport protocols, as well the introduction of the Hearts card game and VSHARE.386, a VxD version of SHARE.EXE.

Windows for Workgroups 3.11

Windows for Workgroups 3.11 (codenamed Snowball) was released on August 11, 1993. It supported 32-bit file access, full 32-bit network redirectors, and VCACHE.386 file cache, shared between them. WFW 3.11 requires a 386 machine to run, as standard mode support has been dropped.

A Winsock package was required to support TCP/IP networking in Windows 3.x. Usually third-party packages were used, but in August 1994, Microsoft released an add-on package (codenamed Wolverine) that provided TCP/IP support in Windows for Workgroups 3.11. Wolverine was a 32-bit stack, which gave it superior performance to most of the third-party TCP/IP Windows stacks available. However, it was only compatible with WFW 3.11, and lacked dial-up support. Wovlerine would later ship with Windows 95.

Editions

Windows 3.1

  • Codename: Janus
  • Release Date: April 6, 1992

New Features

  • TrueType font support.
  • 32-bit disk access
  • Minesweeper
  • Enhanced mode DOS/Windows interaction (some DOS program can use Windows Clipboard)
  • Icons more detailed and can be dragged/dropped.
  • RAM limit increased to 64 MB (single applications limited to 16 MB)
  • Standard Multimedia support.
  • 32-bit disk access (Improved Windows performance)

Windows 3.1 Multimedia PC Version (Beta) only

  • Codename: Bombay
  • Release Date: November 1992

New Features

  • Media Viewer
  • Video File Player.
  • Integrated sound and video with CD-ROM support.

Removed features

  • CGA graphics support (can be manually re-added from Windows 3.0xx)
  • Windows 2.xx application compatibility.
  • Reversi game

Windows 3.1xE (Windows 3.1x for Central and Eastern Europe Features)

  • Support for Cyrillic, Polish and other Central/Eastern European languages.

Windows 3.1J (1993)

  • Support for Japanese language

Modular Windows

Windows 3.11

  • Patch/bugfix release.
  • Same Codename as/of Windows 3.1: Janus
  • Release Date: August 1993

Windows 3.2 (Windows 3.12) (Windows 3.1xC) (November 22, 1994)

Windows for Workgroups (Windows for Workgroups 3.1x)

  • Added networking support via Windows real mode drivers. Uses the SMB protocol over NetBIOS.

Windows for Workgroups 3.1

  • Codename: Kato (Winball)/Jastro (Sparta)
  • Release Date: October 1992

New Features

Windows for Workgroups 3.11 (required 386 or better)

  • Codename: Snowball
  • Release Date: August 11, 1993 (shipped November 1993)

New Features

  • Full 32-bit network redirectors, and the VCACHE.386 file cache, shared between them.

Windows NT 3.1x

  • Codename: AXP/93
  • Release Date: July 27, 1993

New Features

  • NT version of Windows 3.1x.

Add-ons

Winsock

A Winsock package was required to support TCP/IP networking in Windows 3.x. Usually third-party packages were used, but in August 1994, Microsoft released an add-on package (codenamed Wolverine) that provided TCP/IP support in Windows for Workgroups 3.11. Wolverine was a 32-bit stack (accessible from 16-bit Windows applications via WinSock thunks), which gave it superior performance to most of the third-party TCP/IP Windows stacks available. However, it was only compatible with Windows for Workgroups 3.11, and lacked support for dial-up. The Wolverine stack was an early version of the TCP/IP stack that would later ship with Windows 95, and provided an early testbed for the 16-to-32-bit compatibility layer that was crucial to Windows 95's success.

Video for Windows

Release Date: November 1992 (Windows 3.1 and Windows 3.11)

Features

Windows for Pen Computing

Windows for Pen Computing 1.0 was a series of Microsoft-produced add-ons for Microsoft Windows versions in 1992 with additional tools for tablet PCs. Became obsolete due to Tablet PC support for Windows XP Tablet PC Edition in 2002.

Win32s

Windows 3.1x was given limited compatibility with the then-new 32-bit Windows API used by Windows NT by another add-on package, Win32s. There was a rumor that Microsoft did not want to increment any mainstream Windows 3.1x version to something like "Windows 3.2" because it could be confused with the Win32 API or otherwise distract consumers from upgrading to a "real 32-bit OS" like the then-upcoming Windows 95 was, though Windows NT 3.1 and 3.5 were both 32-bit operating systems that looked similar in appearance. For testing of the new Win32s functions the game FreeCell was included.

Controversy

DR-DOS compatibility

The installer to the beta release used code that checked whether it was running on Microsoft-licensed DOS or another DOS operating system (such as DR-DOS). The code ran several functional tests that succeeded on MS-DOS and IBM PC DOS, but resulted in a technical support message on competing operating systems. If the system was not MS-DOS, the installer would fail. Digital Research, who owned DR-DOS, released a patch within weeks to allow the installer to continue. Microsoft disabled, but did not remove, this warning message for the final release of Windows 3.1. When Caldera bought DR-DOS from Novell, they brought a lawsuit against Microsoft over the AARD code, which was later settled.

Gallery of Screenshots for Windows 3.1

Gallery of Screenshots for Windows 3.11 for Workgroups

Gallery of Screenshots for Windows 3.2 (Simplified Chinese version)

External Links

Windows for Workgroups Version History

VersionsComponentsHistory
Original
DOS-based
Windows 1.0Windows 2.0Windows 2.1 (Windows/286Windows/386) • Windows 3.0Windows 3.1x
Windows 9x
Windows 95Windows 98
Windows NT
Early versions
Windows NT 3.1Windows NT 3.5Windows NT 3.51Windows NT 4.0Windows 2000Windows 2000 Millennium Edition
Client
Windows XP (development) • Windows Vista (editionsdevelopment) • Windows 7 (editionsdevelopment) • Windows 8Windows 10
Windows Server
Server 2003Server 2008 (2008 R2) • HPC Server 2008Home ServerSmall Business ServerEssential Business ServerWindows Server 2012Windows Server 2016
Specialized
Windows EmbeddedWindows PEWindows Fundamentals for Legacy PCs
Mobile
Windows MobileWindows Phone
Upcoming
Cancelled
CairoNashvilleNeptuneOdyssey
Related
MetroMidoriOS/2Windows AeroWindows SetupWindows XP themesMicrosoft Plus!

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.